China
Does the World Need Chinese Hegemony?

In 2004, Premier Wen Jiabao said that China’s rise “will not come at the cost of any other country, will not stand in the way of any other country, nor pose a threat to any other country”. The broad Pacific Ocean is vast enough to embrace both China and the United States”, said Chinese President Xi Jinping while meeting US Secretary of State John Kerry in Beijing in May 2015.

The Impact of China’s “One Belt, One Road” Strategy on Political, Military and Economic Situations in the Asia Pacific Region

Retrospect When one talks about Silk Road it conjures up visions of traders and caravans travelling from Occident to the Orient and vice versa. There have been many versions of silk roads which have been used by both traders and invaders for ages. These silk roads connected many cultures and civilizations and these exchanges were largely mutually beneficial. For instance, along with the trade Buddhist religion spread from India to Afghanistan and then to Central Asia, and beyond to China along one of the many silk roads/routes.

China’s Geography: A Boon or Bane?

Strategic thinkers have maintained that geography play a key role in determining a nation's aspirations, goals and behaviour. Taking cue, the author in this paper has delved on China's geography and the courses that this factor might play in China's march towards big power goals in the coming days. Click here to read full paper

Consecration of China’s ‘New Period’ People’s Liberation Army

A Home Run of Military Modernisation At the dawn of Year 2016, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) officially promulgated the commencement of the final phase of restructuring of its apex setup for management of national defence as well as its highest organisation for the exercise of military command and control over its 2.3 million strong People’s Liberation Army (PLA). Click here to read full paper

China's 21st Century Maritime Silk Road Old String with New Pearls?

China and the Indian Ocean Region China has been incessantly increasing its footprint in the Indian Ocean in the past decade by undertaking port infrastructure projects, managing and running ports, gaining port access for naval platforms, acquiring military bases and conducting naval exercises with countries in the region.

Growing Muscle of PLAAF

Steady Growth. Although some signs of a somewhat waning economy are now visible in China (economic growth rate sliding down from 10.5% in 2010 to 7.4% in 2014) she has experienced a steady growth cycle for the past two decades, catapulting the country as the world’s second largest economy. Click here to read full Paper

Trends in Chinese Military Modernization: Implications and Responses

Geo-Political Context The Chinese White Paper on defence of 2015 and the papers issued earlier have been emphasizing that their “national defense policy is defensive in nature... and will never seek hegemony or expansion.” Yet, countries that have been at the receiving end of China’s assertive policies in South China or East China Sea would tend to think otherwise. Click here to read full Paper

Understanding the Chinese One-Belt-One-Road

A glance at the history of the last few centuries, since at least the seventeenth, indicates that the opening decades of all centuries are times of upheaval. New forces frequently emerge, new ideologies, or technologies. These take time to play themselves out. Without being deterministic about such historical cycles, it seems hard to escape the conclusion that we are witnessing one more turn, and that it will be a while before stability will return.​

The Communist Party-Army Equation in China

Preamble In republican scheme of matters, warfare is the ultimate political recourse that is to be prosecuted to seek conditions for advantageous settlement of external disputes. Conversely, in communist theology, military force is but an integral component of external as well as domestic political articulation, more of the latter in fact, for it to remain committed as the guarantor of the regime’s autarkic endeavours. Click here to read full Paper

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