VIF Papers
Professional Military Education - An Indian Experience

Introduction “The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools.” - Thucydides Professional Military Education (PME) has always been a critical component of developing military leaders. It is based on two key principles: train for certainty, so that military personnel gain and master the skills needed for known tasks and educate for uncertainty, so that they have the broad base of knowledge and critical thinking skills needed to handle unanticipated and unpredictable situations.

Weapons and Missiles in the Indian Environment

Firepower in the current era is characterised by multiple combat platforms– guns, howitzers, multi-rockets and missiles - managed through the means of surveillance, target acquisition, engagement, destruction, and finally, damage assessment. For such complex orchestration of firepower to bear fruition, it is necessary to imbibe the right combinations of tactical, technical, logistic and financial factors which have to be derived from fundamental professional acumen rooted at the origins of firepower, the courses of its development and finally, the contemporary parameters of its application.

Afghanistan- Pakistan Transit Trade

Abstract The transit trade problems of Afghanistan are typical to any other landlocked country. As a landlocked country, Afghanistan has relied on Pakistan for its international trade. However, the transit trade of Afghanistan has remained unstable akin to escalated political relations between the two countries. Given economic importance of access to sea, the landlocked countries continued to raise their voice at the United Nations.

The Impact of China’s “One Belt, One Road” Strategy on Political, Military and Economic Situations in the Asia Pacific Region

Retrospect When one talks about Silk Road it conjures up visions of traders and caravans travelling from Occident to the Orient and vice versa. There have been many versions of silk roads which have been used by both traders and invaders for ages. These silk roads connected many cultures and civilizations and these exchanges were largely mutually beneficial. For instance, along with the trade Buddhist religion spread from India to Afghanistan and then to Central Asia, and beyond to China along one of the many silk roads/routes.

Russian, Chinese and American interplay in Central Asia and Afghanistan

India’s Interest in Central Asia In the evolving dynamics of the global order in the twenty first century there has been a fundamental shift in International Politics from Europe to Asia, and particularly to the huge Eurasian landmass. In this changing dynamics, British geographer Halford Mackinder’s theory of geopolitics has regained a new and a powerful currency. According to Mackinder, Central Asia is the ‘pivot of history’, and the huge swathe of landmass is the “Heartlands of Eurasia”. In his view whosoever ‘controls the heartlands of Eurasia, controls the world’.

Missing Factors in India’s Policy towards Pakistan

Many in India often wonder why don’t we have better relations with Pakistan and how long will we keep on bickering and fighting. Many also point to the perils of a miscalculation given that the two countries are nuclear weapons states. The most famous articulation has, of course, been that the bilateral dialogue should be ‘uninterrupted and uninterruptible.

Terror Financing and The Global CTF Regime

How do Terrorists Finance their Operations and Supply their Funds?

China’s Geography: A Boon or Bane?

Strategic thinkers have maintained that geography play a key role in determining a nation's aspirations, goals and behaviour. Taking cue, the author in this paper has delved on China's geography and the courses that this factor might play in China's march towards big power goals in the coming days. Click here to read full paper

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